Wednesday March 25

 

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Pick up the trash along the beach or water way nearby. Leave your footprints, take other people’s junk away.

“Or who enclosed the sea with doors When, bursting forth, it went out from the womb; When I made a cloud its garment” Job 38: 8-11

– See more at: http://bible.knowing-jesus.com/topics/Oceans#sthash.fVqbqd7a.dpuf

Pick up the trash along the beach or waterway nearby. Leave your footprints, take other people’s junk away.

In nature, life operates in a circular system and waste generated by one organism becomes food for another. Fallen leaves decay and the nutrients are returned to the earth, where they become food for the tree again. An exciting challenge facing city communities is to work towards a life without waste,there the unwanted items of one cycle are essential goods for another.

For every bin that we put out in front our homes, about 70 bins of waste are generated during the manufacturing and production of the items we use. For example it take about 75 kg of resources (coal, oil and water) to produce one cellphone and about 1.5kg of resources to produce a toothbrush.

By buying durable and reusable products rather than disposable or cheap items that break quickly, we reduce the waste we produce. This is illustrated in the short documentary “Story of Stuff’ which can be seen at www.storyofstuff.com

Although it is important to pick up litter wherever you see it, it is particularly important to pick it up from waterways and oceans.

We’re treating the oceans like a trash bin: around 80 percent of marine litter originates on land, and most of that is plastic. Plastic that pollutes our oceans and waterways has severe impacts on our environment and our economy. Seabirds, whales, sea turtles and other marine life are eating marine plastic pollution and dying from choking, intestinal blockage and starvation. Scientists are investigating the long-term impacts of toxic pollutants absorbed, transported, and consumed by fish and other marine life, including the potential effects on human health.

Environmental Resource Management

 

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